Cartoons

Our series of "Life in a Matrix" cartoons describe typical incidents for people working in complex matrix, virtual and global organizations.

If, like most of the people we work with, you recognize the symptoms; why not contact us to find out about some of the solutions.

©These images are copyright Global Integration: if you work in an organization and want to use these in presentations or forward them to friends you are free to do so as long as the website address remains on the image. If you wish to use these in publications, training or for commercial gain please request written agreement first. We can also supply higher resolution copies.

  • Bad meetings: the energy stealer

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    Bad meetings: the energy stealer

    People in large companies may spend up to 13 years of their life in unnecessary meetings, It is a tremendous energy stealer.

    Join our Better Meetings Campaign to see how you can improve participation and engagement in your face-to-face and virtual meetings.

  • Not all discussions need a meeting

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    Not all discussions need a meeting

    Not all discussions need a meeting. Many of them are only of one-to-one interest, or are relevant to a subset of the people present.

    Create more engaging meetings by cutting these topics out.

    Join our Better Meetings Campaign to find out how.

  • Meeting stereotypes: Multi-Tasha

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    Meeting stereotypes: Multi-Tasha

    Tasha is a character from our “Better Meetings Campaign”. She multitasks, which as we all know means she doesn’t pay attention.

    (Or does she? Join the discussion here: My meeting, my rules!)

    Dealing with multitasking is an annoying meeting management task.

    Join our campaign to find out how to deal with participants like her: The Global Integration Campaign to stamp out rotten meetings.

    If you’re not a native English speaker you may find this definition useful: Multitask

  • Meeting stereotypes: Rele-Vance

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    Meeting stereotypes: Rele-Vance

    Vance is a model meeting participant!

    He has participated in a topic where he could help, but now realizes the rest of the meeting is irrelevant to him and wants to get back to work.

    See more about how to handle necessary and unnecessary participants in the Global Integration “Better Meetings Campaign”

    Non native-English speakers may find this dictionary definition useful: relevance

  • Meeting stereotypes: Stan Din

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    Meeting stereotypes: Stan Din

    Up to 25% of meeting participants are unnecessary to deliver the work of the meeting.

    This cartoon from our “Better Meetings Campaign” shows Stan: he has been sent along to the meeting because his bosses couldn’t (or didn’t want to) make it – again!

    Getting the right people in the room is critical to effective meetings.

    Join the campaign to find out how to deal with participants like Stan: Campaign for Better Meetings 

    (Non-native English speakers may find this definition useful: stand-in)

  • Meeting stereotypes: Visi-bill

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    Meeting stereotypes: Visi-bill

    Up to 25% of meeting participants are unnecessary to delivering the work of the meeting.

    This cartoon from our “Better Meetings Campaign” shows Bill who attends meetings to improve his visibility, even though he has nothing useful to add.

    Join the campaign to find out how to deal with participants like Bill: Campaign for Better Meeetings

     

     

  • Conference call realities

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    Conference call realities

    What really happens in conference calls?

    Well….23% are paying attention, 27% and multitasking, 13% are daydreaming and 8% are not fully dressed.

    It’s harder to create engagement in virtual meetings. If the content is boring people will  – quite rightly – do something else.

    • Find out how to run more engaging meetings in our Better Meetings Campaign 
    • Find out more about training and consultancy services for virtual teams: here.

     

  • Kevan’s Matrix Management Mix

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    Kevan's Matrix Management Mix

    In a departure to our normal cartoons, we have added this one, inspired by a blog post by Global Integration’s CEO Kevan Hall, asking whether his early training at Microsoft was where the term ‘dogfooding’ originated: Who invented the term dogfooding – was it me?

    (You can see some of the company’s training in action photos here.)

     

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